Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: Substrates and materials for research and applications

Discovered by Richard Van Duyne in 1976, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has enjoyed a continual expansion in interest over the past 36 years benefitting from a series of discoveries, new fields, and technological capabilities, all of which have greatly contributed…

Discovered by Richard Van Duyne in 1976, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has enjoyed a continual expansion in interest over the past 36 years benefitting from a series of discoveries, new fields, and technological capabilities, all of which have greatly contributed to the current broad interest in this topic. The focus on nanoscience and nanotechnology that began in the early 1990s naturally put a spotlight on SERS as a quintessentially nanoscale phenomenon. This article discusses some of the key field-shaping developments in SERS from a historical and a materials perspective, providing background for the articles in this issue of MRS Bulletin.