NIH grant could develop technology to help personalize leukemia treatments

People affected by leukemia and health care professionals who advocate for personalized medicine options could benefit from technology that is being developed with funding from a National Institutes of Health grant. Tymora Analytical Operations LLC, Purdue University and St. Jude…

People affected by leukemia and health care professionals who advocate for personalized medicine options could benefit from technology that is being developed with funding from a National Institutes of Health grant.

Tymora Analytical Operations LLC, Purdue University and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have been awarded a one-year, $300,000 Phase I STTR grant from the NIH. The groups will develop technology that could pinpoint the proteins inside cells affected by the disease so treatments can be more targeted.
“By showing which proteins are affected by the disease, this platform can highlight the differences between leukemia cells,” said Anton Iliuk, chief technology officer of Tymora Analytical Operations. “Identifying these differences would enable doctors to prescribe individualized, more precise drug treatment regimens for each patient.”
The new platform will be developed from the company’s pIMAGO and PolyMAC technologies.
The principal investigator for the project is W. Andy Tao, associate professor of biochemistry in Purdue’s College of Agriculture. He also is chief scientific officer at Tymora Analytical Operations. The co-investigator is Jun J. Yang of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Source: Purdue University
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