Global atrial fibrillation market to be worth $14.8B in 2019

The global atrial fibrillation market is expected to be worth $14.8 billion in 2019, at a compound annual growth rate of 13.4% from 2013 to 2019. That forecast comes from Transparency Market Research, a market intelligence firm, that found that…

The global atrial fibrillation market is expected to be worth $14.8 billion in 2019, at a compound annual growth rate of 13.4% from 2013 to 2019.

That forecast comes from Transparency Market Research, a market intelligence firm, that found that a “rising base of the global geriatric population” is one of the top drivers of the market. In 2010, the CDC estimated 2,6 million Americans to have atrial fibrillation. That number is expected to grow to 12 million in 2050.
Favorable results of clinical trials testing leading pharmacological products as well as increasing prevalence of conditions that cause atrial fibrillation such as obesity and hypertension are also considerable market drivers.
Drug therapy had the biggest share of the atrial fibrillation treatment market in 2012 and that is only expected to grow. But in non-drug treatments, catheter ablation procedures accounted for 45% of the market share last year. Catheter ablation procedures to treat atrial fibrillation lead electric cardioversion and maze surgery in the non-pharmacological treatment area.
The catheter ablation market will continue to dominate the non-drug treatment market especially with the introduction of new catheter ablation systems such as CardioFocus’s HeartLight Endoscopic Ablation System (EAS) laser ablation catheter, Endosense’s TactiCath and Biosense Webster’s ThermoCool SmartTouch, the report found.
Catheters made by Endosense and Biosense Webster have the ability to tell physicians in real time how much force they are applying to a heart wall during a cardiac ablation procedure to repair cardiac arrhythmias. This is called force-sensing.
This knowledge is important because without force-sensing, physicians have to estimate how much force is being applied. Too much force can cause tissue injury and procedure complications, while too little force can lead to incomplete lesion formation, which essentially means that atrial fibrillation can recur down the road requiring a repeat ablative procedure.
In fact, sensing potential for these treatments, St. Jude Medical announced in August it was buying Endonsense in a deal worth $331 million.