COMPETITION: Colin Campbell Mitchell Award 2021

Awarded to an individual or team of up to six engineers, either working or studying in the UK. It will be awarded for having made the greatest contribution to the advancement of any field of engineering within the period of…

Awarded to an individual or team of up to six engineers, either working or studying in the UK. It will be awarded for having made the greatest contribution to the advancement of any field of engineering within the period of the four years prior to the making of the award. A cash prize of £3,000 will be awarded to an individual, up to a maximum of £6,000 for a team.

The Colin Campbell Mitchell Award commemorates the life and work of one of Scotland’s most accomplished marine engineers. Edinburgh-born Colin Campbell Mitchell OBE FRSE (1904-69) had a long and distinguished career with Brown Brothers Engineering, where he pioneered the development of the steam catapult for use on aircraft carriers.

Recipients
2020
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2020
Reaction Engines

A team from Reaction Engines, led by Dr Helen Webber, won the Royal Academy of Engineering Colin Campbell Mitchell Award for the successful completion of high-temperature tests of a unique precooler system for the SABRE engine project. This technology hybrid jet/rocket engine is designed to power a single-stage fully reusable launch vehicle able to take off and land horizontally on an airfield, and could be a key breakthrough in making space travel more affordable and could also have important applications closer to Earth.

Academy recognises pioneering engineers’ leading innovations from polymers to medical devices
2019
Colin Campbell Mitchell Award winning team. From left to right: Professor Barrie Hayes-Gill, Dr Jean Francois Pieri, Dr Terence Martin, Dr Carl Barratt, Kanwaljit Bhogal
2019
A multidisciplinary team of engineers and healthcare experts from the University of Nottingham, Monica Healthcare and GE Healthcare are to receive this year’s Colin Campbell Mitchell Award from the Royal Academy of Engineering for developing the Monica Novii™ Wireless Patch System, a wearable monitor for women in labour that accurately and continuously monitors the baby’s heartbeat. Professor Barrie Hayes-Gill and Professor John Crowe from the University of Nottingham, Terence Martin from Monica Healthcare, and Kanwaljit Bhogal, Jean-Francois Pieri and Carl Barratt from GE Healthcare, collaborated to apply practical electronics and biomedical engineering to a real-world medical setting, to address the challenges of reliably and accurately measuring the heartbeat of a baby during labour.

Colin Campbell Mitchell press release 2019