$15,000,000 allocated by SEES for the sustainability of coastal systems

Document Type: Grants Notice Funding Opportunity Number: 12-594 Opportunity Category: Discretionary Posted Date: August 09, 2012 Closing Date for Applications: January 17, 2013. Full Proposal Deadline(s): January 17, 2013 NSF anticipates an annual call for proposals by this program Archive…

Document Type: Grants Notice

Funding Opportunity Number: 12-594

Opportunity Category: Discretionary

Posted Date: August 09, 2012

Closing Date for Applications: January 17, 2013.

Full Proposal Deadline(s): January 17, 2013 NSF anticipates an annual call for proposals by this program

Archive Date: Feb 17, 2013

Funding Instrument Type: Grant

Category of Funding Activity: Science and Technology and other Research and Development

Expected number of Awards: 15

Estimated Total Program Funding: $15,000,000

Award Floor: $750,000

CFDA Number(s):

47.041 — Engineering Grants

47.050 — Geosciences

47.074 — Biological Sciences

47.075 — Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences

47.078 — Polar Programs

Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Additional Information on Eligibility:

*Organization Limit: Proposals may only be submitted by the following: – Coastal SEES proposals may only be submitted by U.S. academic institutions that have research and degree-granting education programs in any area of research supported by NSF.U.S. academic institutions include universities as well as four-year colleges accredited in, and having a campus located in the U.S., acting on behalf of their faculty members. Proposals may also be submitted by non-profit, non-academic organizations, including independent museums, observatories, research laboratories, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. associated with educational or research activities. 

Agency Name

National Science Foundation

Description

A sustainable world is one in which human needs are met equitably and without sacrificing the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Meeting this formidable challenge requires a substantial increase in our understanding of the integrated system of society, the natural world, and the alterations humans bring to Earth. NSF’s Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability (SEES) activities aim to address this need through support for interdisciplinary research and education. Coastal SEES is focused on the sustainability of coastal systems. For this solicitation we define coastal systems as the swath of land closely connected to the sea, including barrier islands, wetlands, mudflats, beaches, estuaries, cities, towns, recreational areas, and maritime facilities; the continental seas and shelves; and the overlying atmosphere. These systems are subject to complex and dynamic interactions among natural and human-driven processes. Coastal systems are crucial to regional and national economies, hosting valued human-built infrastructure and providing ecosystem services that sustain human well-being. More than half of the world’s human population lived in coastal areas in 2000, and this proportion is predicted to increase to 75 percent by 2025. Humans benefit from their use of coastal environments for enjoyment, dwelling, food, industry, and commerce, altering them physically, chemically, and ecologically. These alterations influence and interact with natural variability, extreme events, and long-term change to affect the system as a whole, including human benefits. A major challenge is to understand the dynamics of this coupled human-natural system in order to inform societal decisions about the uses of coastal systems, including for economic, aesthetic, recreational, research, and conservation purposes. Such understanding requires integration of natural, social, economic and behavioral sciences. It includes, for example, an understanding of reciprocal feedbacks between humans and the natural environment; how people and organizations interpret, assess, and act upon scientific and other evidence; and how they weigh these interpretations against other interests to influence governance and decision-making. Thus, coastal sustainability relies on broad and intimately interconnected areas of scholarship about natural and human processes.